Skip to content
S.C. Emergency Medical Services
  • Effective June 24, 2013, our offices have relocated to 301 Gervais St, Columbia, SC, 29201

Regulation 61-7 Frequently Asked Questions

A copy of which type of DEA license needs to be given to the Department?
The South Carolina State Controlled Substance Registration

Our Medical Control Physician attended a workshop 15 years ago, does she need to go through a “refresher”?
Medical Control Physicians need only attend one workshop during their lifetime to meet this requirement set forth by regulation. However, policies and procedures do change over time so it is advisable that the physician attend a workshop every so often to get the updates.

I have a BLS license. When dispatching a call can I send the ambulance enroute with a driver and allow the EMT to arrive on-scene via QRV or personal vehicle?
The answer is no. Regulation clearly states that an EMT must be onboard the ambulance when dispatched. This holds true for all licensure levels.

As a non-emergent transport provider (private, non-9-1-1 provider), how can I provide emergency response to a call?
First and foremost, according to the South Carolina Code of Laws Section 56- 5-760 which govern the operation of authorized emergency vehicles, the call must be an emergency. Once it is established that the patient does in fact meet the requirements for an emergency response to the scene, there are actually two ways to go about responding. The easiest of which is to obtain a mutual aid agreement with the local emergency transport service provider. The other, when a call is received by your dispatch center for an emergent call that requires you to respond with lights and sirens, contact the dispatch center for the local emergency provider and inform them of the circumstances. Should their dispatch center request that your service respond to the call, document the request and respond. Remember this regulation item not only protects the citizens on South Carolina’s roadways from an abundance of vehicles running Code 3, but also protects the services from being sued and/or fined for delay of patient care and going against a city/county ordinance.

I have an “Enhanced Basic Life Support” license and noticed that this licensure category has been removed. What will happen to my license?
When your license is up for renewal, you will be given the option to either downgrade to the BLS license or, if your service meets the minimum requirements, upgrade to either the Intermediate or Advanced license.

What size/quantity of LMA or Dual Lumen devices are required?
The goal is to provide alternate airways for infants, children and adults. As such, one alternative airway for each size patient shall be required. LMA devices come in the following sizes: 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5. The Combi-Tube has not yet been manufactured for use in children and therefore will only meet the adult requirement.

Is there a specific brand of pediatric drug dose chart or tape that is required?
The Department will not require use of a specific brand as there are many charts and tapes that meet this requirement including the Broselow Tape, Pedi-Wheel, and Informed Pediatric Drug Dose Chart.

I noticed the D5W has been taken off the equipment list. Can I still carry it on my ambulances?
Yes. D5W is still an approved fluid and can certainly be carried on units. It is important to keep in mind that these regulations prescribe the minimum standards. All services can go above and beyond the minimum equipment standards so long as the item has been approved for use by the Department.

I am a state paramedic who has never had a National Registry credential, do I need to get one in order to be recertified?
Paramedics and Intermediates who have completed their course prior to June 23, 2006 do not need to maintain a National Registry credential to be recertified. However, should they allow their state certification to expire, upon application for recertification and successful completion of a SC approved formal refresher course, they will be given a 1 year provisional certificate and must obtain a National Registry credential prior to the end of the one year period. Paramedics and Intermediates who have completed their course after June 23, 2006 must maintain their National Registry credential in order to be recertified REGARDLESS of whether or not they are using IST to recertify. All Basic EMTs must maintain a National Registry credential in order to be certified and recertified REGARDLESS of whether or not they are using IST to recertify.

I am an Intermediate who used to have a National Registry credential but let it drop a while ago. Do I need to get it back in order to be recertified?
Paramedics and Intermediates who have completed their course prior to June 23, 2006 do not need to maintain a National Registry credential to be recertified. However, should they allow their state certification to expire, upon application for recertification and successful completion of a SC approved formal refresher course, they will be given a 1 year provisional certificate and must obtain a National Registry credential prior to the end of the one year period. Paramedics and Intermediates who have completed their course after June 23, 2006 must maintain their National Registry credential in order to be recertified REGARDLESS of whether or not they are using IST to recertify. All Basic EMTs must maintain a National Registry credential in order to be certified and recertified REGARDLESS of whether or not they are using IST to recertify.

Who is subject to the fines imposed by the Department?
Any EMS entity that is regulated by the Department and subject to the provisions of Regulation 61-7 including, but not limited to, EMTs (all levels), training institutions, EMT instructors, Medical Control Physicians, and EMS services.

When is the deadline for meeting all of the new requirements?
By September 1st all services should be compliant with the new requirements. It is understood, however, that certain items may take longer to complete due to circumstances beyond the service’s control (i.e. back-order, shipment delays, etc.). In such cases, documentation to demonstrate attempt at compliance (purchase orders, invoices) may be necessary to avoid monetary penalties.

As a Licensed Service Provider, I recently purchased an ambulance from another service to add to my fleet.  It has a painted stripe, am I required to add a reflective stripe?

Yes. The services that had the units in service prior to June 23, 2006 were grand fathered into the regulation 61-7 changes. Once that unit is removed from the original service’s fleet, it must meet the requirements of any new unit in order to get permitted. The stripe and all lettering must be of contrasting color and reflective.

I would like to paint my ambulances with a new color scheme – what do I need to do?
There will be no exceptions made to the requirements set forth in regulation. As such, while it is not mandatory, it is strongly suggested that the service submit a sketch of the proposed color scheme to the Department for review prior to painting any ambulance. This will help ensure there will be no problems and avoid the need to repaint the ambulance(s) to meet the regulation requirements. Also of note: The Star of Life emblems that are required according to regulation must be BLUE. Should a provider wish to add additional Star of Life emblems, they can be of any color so long as the required ones remain BLUE.

Can I substitute a 30cc syringe for a 10cc and/or a 20cc syringe?
No. Unless otherwise noted in Regulation or in writing by the Department, there can be no equipment substitutions.


For additional information, call (803) 545-4204