Hepatitis A - Possible Restaurant Exposure

Monday, July 1, 2019

3D x-ray image of torso with visible red liver


In a continuing effort to provide the public vital information about the spread of hepatitis A in South Carolina in the most efficient and appropriate manner, DHEC will report cases involving potential exposures at restaurants on our agency website.

Huddle House, 1029 W. Dekalb St., Kershaw County

Customers who ate at Huddle House at 1029 W Dekalb St., Camden, in Kershaw County, between June 14 and June 28, 2019, might have been exposed to the hepatitis A virus. DHEC was notified on June 28, 2019, that an employee of the restaurant tested positive for hepatitis A. DHEC is working with Huddle House to investigate possible exposures and provide guidance for preventive treatment for anyone who may be affected.

This illness is not a foodborne outbreak. The concern is not the restaurant. It is with a food handler who has hepatitis A infection, and they can spread the virus up to two weeks before they know they are sick. The risk of the hepatitis A virus spreading from an infected employee to customers in a restaurant setting is low. The restaurant received an A rating from DHEC at the last inspection conducted on Aug. 16, 2018. The restaurant is complying with DHEC’s recommendations.

As a precaution, in these situations, vaccination should be considered for individuals who were exposed during the time the food handler was contagious.

Post-exposure vaccination should be considered for individuals who have not been vaccinated if it can be given within two weeks from their date of consuming anything from the restaurant. People who ate food prepared at the restaurant between June 17 and June 28, 2019, may contact their medical provider or pharmacy about post exposure treatment. In South Carolina, adults 18 years and older can get vaccinated at some local pharmacies without a prescription, depending on your insurance coverage.

Restaurant patrons who were potentially exposed also can visit the Kershaw County Health Department, 116 Church St., Camden, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday (July 2) and 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday (July 3). No appointment is necessary.

The vaccine is not shown to prevent infection when administered more than 14 days after a specific exposure. However, vaccination more than 14 days after exposure will give long-lasting protection from infection from future exposures.

As of today, customers and staff who ate at the restaurant between June 14 and June 16, 2019, are not likely to benefit from post-exposure treatment. Anyone who ate at the restaurant between these dates should watch for symptoms of infection, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain or yellowing of the eyes and skin. People usually become sick within two to six weeks after being exposed to the virus. Seek medical care if symptoms develop.

Certain individuals are at greater risk for severe hepatitis A infection and are encouraged to seek vaccination. Those individuals include anyone with a weakened immune system, or existing liver disease such as hepatitis B or C, or cirrhosis (alcoholic liver disease).

DHEC declared a statewide hepatitis A outbreak on May 13, based on a steady increase in the number of cases. Between Nov. 1, 2018, and June 28, 2019, 172 hepatitis A cases have been reported. Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. Most people who get hepatitis A feel sick for several weeks, but they usually recover completely and do not have lasting liver damage. Certain individuals are at greater risk for severe hepatitis A infection and are encouraged to seek vaccination. Those individuals include anyone with a weakened immune system, liver disease (such as hepatitis B or C) or anyone who abuses injection or non-injection drugs.

If patrons of the restaurant have questions or concerns, they may contact DHEC’s Careline at 1-855-4SC-DHEC (1-855-472-3432). Careline staff will be available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. to answer your questions. For more information on hepatitis A, visit the DHEC website or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

In a continuing effort to provide the public vital information about the spread of hepatitis A in South Carolina in the most efficient and appropriate manner, DHEC has begun reporting cases involving potential exposures at restaurants on our agency website. This most recent case, as well as previous and all future cases, can be found on our Hepatitis A Outbreak page at www.scdhec.gov/HepA.


Vaccination

Talk to your medical provider about the hepatitis A vaccine. In South Carolina, adults 18 years and older can get vaccinated at some local pharmacies without a prescription, depending on your insurance coverage. To search for a nearby pharmacy that offers vaccines, visit www.vaccinefinder.org.

DHEC’s local health departments also provide hepatitis A vaccines. DHEC has an Adult Vaccine Program that provides low-cost vaccines for uninsured or underinsured individuals who are 19 years and older.

DHEC’s local health departments are currently providing no-cost hepatitis A vaccines to individuals in at-risk groups (drug users, homeless, recently incarcerated, and men who have sex with men).

To schedule an appointment for vaccination at your local health department, call 855-472-3432 or visit www.scdhec.gov/HealthClinics.

Previous Updates

For more information on hepatitis A, visit the DHEC website or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Tags

Viral Hepatitis Statewide